Is my cat at risk for parasites if he only goes outside occasionally?

By September 24, 2013Uncategorized

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Outdoor Cat127

 

This is the second part of my blog focusing on internal parasites (worms).  In this one I want to particularly focus on cats.  I am very interested in parasitology and I really believe that there are some misconceptions of pets at risk.

Cat Owners In Toronto

When asked, most of our cat owning clientele, in the urban Toronto area consider their cats “indoors” but many also follow this comment up with “well, he goes outside occasionally”

So When is my “Indoor” cat at risk for intestinal parasites?

It seems like such a simple question but there are many misconceptions as to what this actually means. The answer is that ANY cat that spends ANY time outdoors, be it lazing about or actively exploring – even if only within the confines of your seemingly safe backyard – is at risk for being exposed to and infected with intestinal parasites.

Our Veterinary Hospital Advise

At RYAH, we advise annual stool sample testing, along with preventive oral deworming given 4 times yearly (once every 3 months) for ALL CATS who spend any time  in the outdoor environment. By planning ahead, we can prevent our pets from getting infected and also reduce the risk of human contact also —- this is especially important in households with “at-risk” individuals such as children, and those who are elderly or immune-compromised

.An on-going study of RYAH patients who submit routine annual fecal samples for testing has revealed that on average, almost 7% of family pets are testing positive for one or more parasites.

Remember that there are many parasites that can affect humans too!!!  Since our pets are our family, we ALL need to do our part to keep them safe – and ourselves too.

Our hospital’s deworming protocols follow all of the current medical recommendations and guidelines of both the AAHA (American Animal Hospital Association)  and CAPC (the Companion Animal Parasite Council).
As responsible pet owners, we all need to do our part to keep everyone safe.

Dr. Annelle Valentin
www.wormsandgermsblog.com
www.capcvet.org